Surviving In an
Angry World

Surviving in an Angry World, Excerpts

I define anger as a strong, intense feeling of displeasure, hostility, or indignation resulting from a real or imagined threat, insult, injustice, or frustration to you or others who are important to you.

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You have been given emotions so that by an act of your human will, you might be directed toward right behavior.

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Your emotions are never to rule over you. You are to be the master of your responses and reactions.

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The moment you feel an intense emotion, the first thing you need to do is ask, How should I respond?

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People give a number of excuses to justify their anger. The top five excuses I hear are 1. Everyone gets angry. I’m no different from anybody else. 2. I’ve always had a short temper. 3. I have a very good reason for being angry. 4. I’ve been hurt so deeply that I can’t help but feel anger. 5. If I don’t stay angry, I’ll be hurt even more than I already have been. These excuses aren’t good enough to justify hanging on to anger that can destroy your life. Give up your excuses and get on with releasing your anger.

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I encourage people to develop a certain habit when they feel anger rising up inside them. If you start seeing red, choose to visualize it in the shape of a stop sign. Imagine yourself at an intersection, and come to a full stop. Carefully consider all the directions your anger can go, then respond slowly and deliberately. Psalm 103:8 says that God is “slow to anger.” James 1:19 encourages everyone to be “quick to hear, slow to speak and slow to anger.” Make sure your response will be a godly one. Rule your tongue. Don’t speak too quickly.

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There is very little value in venting anger just for the sake of venting it. Behavioral scientists have discovered that even after an individual screams into a pillow, most of the feelings of anger that have taken up residence in that person are still there. Expressing anger does not produce healing. There is value in venting one’s emotions in conversation with a trusted friend or counselor who can provide valuable insight and help you find rational solutions. It is not always possible, however, to have the right person available at the exact time a listening and caring heart is needed. But there is Someone to whom you always can voice your deepest emotions. Go to God with your anger. Get by yourself, on your knees, with your Bible open. Ask the Lord to show you why you’re angry and what you can do to redirect your negative feelings into positive behavior. He knows why you’re angry. He knows your situation and your circumstances. Trust Him to reveal the best way to identify, deal with, and let go of your anger. As you read your Bible, focus on the words of Jesus in the four Gospels. Or turn to the book of Psalms for encouragement and peace. Practical, how-to advice is found in the book of Proverbs. And for guidance on victorious Christian living, open your Bible to any of Paul’s writings, including Romans, Ephesians, and Philippians.











Josh Hunt ● www.joshhunt.com ● josh@joshhunt.com ● 575.650.4564 ● 1964 Sedona Hills Parkway, Las Cruces, NM 88011
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